A Panic Attack or a Heart Attack?

Abstract

Ever found yourself sitting in a car, cruising through the jammed traffic, with honking all around when you need to reach to that important meeting on time, and suddenly Anxiety washes over you. You’re cold and hot at the same time. Sweat trickling down the back of your neck and hands shivering with lots of curses coming out of your mind and mouth. This is a Panic Attack!! What if you start wondering if the things happening to you are more than just a panic attack. Perhaps a Heart Attack?

The links between the heart and the mind are harder to measure than those between the heart and the waistline. But a growing body of evidence suggests that psychological factors are — literally — heartfelt, and can contribute to cardiac risk.

Stressors that Harm Heart

Some particular events, like the death of a spouse or getting fired from a job, are extremely stressful. Yet research indicates that less dramatic but more constant types of stress may also harm your heart. Workplace stress, Financial stress, marital or relationship stress and sudden disaster-related stress, all contribute to the slow weakening of the Heart and development of Cardiac problems.

What is a Panic Attack?

It is noteworthy, that severe anxiety- which may manifest as a panic attack — can mimic a heart attack. One analysis of studies involving people admitted to emergency rooms for chest pain found that 22% of those who underwent cardiovascular testing had panic disorder rather than heart disease. Another extremely common symptom related to anxiety, particularly in women, are palpitations — the sensation that your heart is racing or beating too fast. When a panic attack happens you are most likely to have symptoms like shortness of breath, nausea, irregular heartbeat, dry mouth, sweating, dizziness etc.

Stressed at Workplace

Work Can Be Stressful Sometimes

Panic Attack or a Heart Attack?

Both a panic attack and a heart attack can cause shortness of breath, sweating, or dizziness. Below are some of the factors that help to differentiate a panic attack from a heart attack.

Panic Attack:

In a panic attack one is more likely to feel a sudden onset of fear and terror in conjunction with heart palpitations and chest pain. Pain and discomfort tend to occur in the center of the chest, but the chest pain or any other pain subsides in just a few minutes.

Heart Attack:

In the case of Heart Attack, there is a gradual onset of pain, pressure or tightness in the upper part of the chest. Pain may also occur in the center of the chest but may radiate in upper parts of the body like jaw, arms, and shoulders. Such symptoms last for more than 15 minutes without subsiding on the intensity and may also continue for hours.

Panic Attack Heart Attack

Panic Attack or Heart Attack

How Can Sanket Help?

Sanket is a breakthrough innovation which helps you keep a tab on your stress levels on a daily basis by measuring your heart rate and heart rate variability. With Sanket device and Sanket App, you can measure your resting heart rate and with that, every change in HR and HRV gives you an indication of possible stress, stress causing situations (Stressors) and possibly severe anxiety or a Panic Attack. Not just this, since Sanket measures your complete ECG, it gives you a clear indication if a Heart attack is happening or is it just a panic attack.

Sanket ECG and Stress Monitor

Sanket Monitors ECG and Stress Levels

Stress can be easily managed, once you know the stressors and can measure stress. Don’t let stress kill your Heart which is made to love!!

India needs a comprehensive approach to combating heart disease -Vice President

Vice President inaugurates 11th World Heart Day event

The Vice President of India, Shri M. Hamid Ansari said that we would need a comprehensive approach to combating heart disease. He was addressing the inaugural session of 11th Annual World Heart Day event, here today.

The Vice President has said that India has seen a rapid transition in its heart disease burden over the past couple of decades and the load of communicable and non‐communicable diseases is projected to get reversed in 2020. Demographic projections suggest a major increase in cardiovascular disease mortality as life expectancy increases and the age structure of the growing population changes, he added.

Shri M. Hamid Ansari said that the growth of heart diseases is dependent on a number of interlinked factors such as aging, changing lifestyles and food habits and rapidly evolving socioeconomic determinants like access to healthcare, environmental stress and income levels also impact cardiovascular diseases risk factors.

The Vice President said that we would need a comprehensive approach to combating heart disease, with a focus on education and access to proper health facilities. For this both the public and the private sectors have to work together, he added.

Following is the text of the Vice President’s inaugural address:

“I am delighted to be part of the programs to commemorate World Heart Day.

The World Heart Day, since 2000, has become a landmark event to inform and educate the people around the world about health risks related to the human heart. The focus of the activities related to the world heart day has been on creating awareness to allow the people to make healthy choices and reduce cardiovascular risk. Such an effort is much needed given that heart disease are now the world’s leading causes of death, claiming 17.3 million lives each year.

I applaud these efforts to educate the people on the problems and causes of heart disease and to work together with– our doctors, scientists, teachers, businessmen, parents and children – to promote healthy lifestyles and ensure a healthier future for our people.

India has seen a rapid transition in its heart disease burden over the past couple of decades. The load of communicable and non‐communicable diseases is projected to get reversed in 2020. Demographic projections suggest a major increase in cardiovascular disease mortality as life expectancy increases and the age structure of the growing population changes.

A conservative estimate indicates that there could be more than 30 million heart patients in India, of which about 14 million are in urban and 16 million in rural areas. If the current trend continues by the year 2020, the burden of atherothrombotic cardiovascular diseases in India will surpass other regions of the world.

The growth of heart diseases is dependent on a number of interlinked factors such as aging, changing lifestyles and food habits. Rapidly evolving socioeconomic determinants like access to healthcare, environmental stress and income levels also impact cardiovascular diseases risk factors.

However, the growth of heart diseases affects not just the urban and economically well‐off but also the under privileged. The Indian rural population and urban poor are facing a “double burden” – with incidences of acute diseases continuing, while there is a rapid growth in incidences of chronic diseases.

The key challenges being faced in cardiac care in India are low availability of facilities, lack of accessibility, and limited affordability of effective and efficient treatment, coupled with lack of awareness towards non-communicable diseases including cardiovascular diseases.

In response to ever-rising burden of cardiovascular diseases, the Government has initiated an integrated National Programme for Prevention and Control of Cancers, Diabetes, Cardiovascular Diseases and Stroke (NPCDCS). The aim of the program is prevention and control of common non-communicable disease risk factors through an integrated approach and reduction of premature morbidity and mortality. The programme has led to some capacity building of health systems and improvement in quality of care; large gaps however still exists and there is extreme pressure on the limited resources available.

The Public Health Foundation of India in collaboration with the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare has also started programmes to advance consciousness of disease prevention measures. These include early detection, healthy lifestyle and diet, physical activity, yoga and stress management.

The Parliament in 2003 passed the Cigarettes and other Tobacco Products Act to further the cause of prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

Today, cardiac hospitals in India perform over 200,000 open heart surgeries per year, one of the highest, worldwide. There has been a steady annual rise to the tune of 25‐30 percent per year in the number of coronary interventions over the past several years. This suggests that the disease is now achieving epidemic proportions; it also shows that the accessibility of the population to advanced cardiac facilities is increasing.

We would need a comprehensive approach to combating heart disease, with a focus on education and access to proper health facilities. For this both the public and the private sectors have to work together. Events like the World Heart Day go a long way in bringing the risk of heart diseases into focus and riveting public attention on this issue.

I commend the organizers for taking this initiative. I wish them success in this endeavor.

Jai Hind.”

Source here

One person dies every 33 seconds owing to an heart attack in India, says a top city cardiologist, adding that the deadly condition is making Indians its victim 10 years ahead of the people in the West.

“India is currently witnessing nearly two million heart attacks a year and majority of the victims are youngsters,” said Dr Ashwani Mehta, senior consultant cardiologist at Sir Ganga Ram Hospital here

He was delivering a public lecture on “Living with Heart Disease: All about Stents and Interventions” at the India International Centre (IIC) in the heart of the capital on Tuesday.

“Men living in cities are three times more prone to heart attacks than people living in villages. As for women, the risk rises significantly after menopause,” Mehta told the gathering.

Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) or “bad” cholesterol is the leading factor for heart attacks.

Diabetes, smoking, high blood pressure, genetic history, lifestyles, especially the higher intake of carbohydrate rich foods and lack of regular physical exercise are other factors that lead to heart attack.

Patients often tend to neglect chest pain citing acidity or gastric trouble which, Mehta said, should not be overlooked.
“Any discomfort or any exertions that a person experiences after walking, particularly if it persists after taking rest, could be linked to heart and should not be ignored but should be immediately taken care,” Mehta noted.

In a recently completed project at Queen Alexandra Hospital in Portsmouth, twice as many stroke patients received the correct atrial fibrillation (AF) diagnosis with thumb-ECG (Zenicor) compared to current standard of care. The aim of the project was to develop and improve the diagnosis of AF for stroke patients in Portsmouth and to prevent recurrent strokes. The study was presented recently at the European Stroke Organisation Conference, Venice, Italy.

The thumb-ECG device has been used at Queen Alexandra Hospital in Portsmouth by 70 stroke patients over six months. The patients were investigated with thumb-ECG for three weeks in combination with continuous 24 hours Holter-ECG. With thumb-ECG, 14% of the patients were diagnosed with AF but only 7% were detected with the Holter ECG. The results are consistent with previous research from Sweden, where 7–11% of AF has been diagnosed with thumb-ECG and 1.5–4% with Holter-ECG.

Project lead Dr Ugnius Sukys (Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth) said: “We could repeat the results from the Swedish studies, and the investigation with Zenicor thumb-ECG even proved to be more effective in the Portsmouth population of stroke patients. We detected AF in a number of patients who would have been missed otherwise, and could therefore provide a better treatment for our stroke patients”.

If you’re experiencing dizziness, shortness of breath, chest discomfort, or palpitations your doctor may suggest that you have an electrocardiogram. This cardiovascular test, abbreviated as EKG or ECG, is a non-invasive test typically performed in your doctor’s office and measures the electrical activity of the heartbeat.

How Is an Electrocardiogram Conducted?

No special patient preparation is required for an EKG test.  During the test, you will lie on an exam table and a technician will place several small sensors on your chest, arms and legs.  These sensors have wires called leads which connect to the electrocardiogram machine. They create a 3D map of your heart’s natural electrical rhythms, which can immediately show whether you have any unusual heart activity. The sensors don’t deliver any electrical current; they only record your body’s own natural heart rhythms. The test lasts for six seconds, and the results are printed out and can be interpreted immediately.

What an EKG Is Looking For

This test primarily checks the rhythmic behavior of different chambers of your heart.  By measuring the time interval of the ECG a doctor can determine how long it is taking an electrical wave to pass through your heart.  This shows if the electrical activity is normal, fast, slow or irregular.  It also measures the amount of electrical activity passing through the heart which helps your cardiologist find out if your heart is enlarged or is overworked.

EKGs Tell the Story of Your Heart

An EKG can help physicians diagnose a real-time emergency, such as a heart attack in progress, but it can also help detect patterns that emerge over time. For example, if you have high blood pressure, the EKG may show that your heart has become enlarged due to the extra work of pumping blood under higher pressure. EKGs can also detect when the electrolyte levels in your blood are too high or too low, as those variations change the heart’s conductivity. Finally, the test can identify changes in your heart that occurred as a result of a past heart attack. This is important because some people may have had a heart attack without their knowledge and the EKG can show the presence of cardiac damage that requires treatment.

Additional Cardiovascular Tests

In some cases, especially if you have intermittent symptoms, a six-second snapshot of heart activity doesn’t provide enough information. Small portable EKG machines like SanketLife can be carried in a bag or backpack and perform ECG test without any lead or Gel over the course of 24 hours and lifetime. During such a test period, you can do almost anything you normally would, except for bathing or showering.

It’s important to be aware that a normal ECG doesn’t definitively rule out all cardiac issues, and your physician may suggest further types of testing. These may include a cardiac stress test or nuclear stress test.

A Heart Patient’s best freind

Sanket is a best friend for a heart patient and here is why –

MOBILITY ASSESMENT VIA SANKET

Assess your mobility and the effects that basic functional mobility has on your cardiovascular system. Sanket timely reminds you for mobility, also alerts when it senses higher mobility levels approaching. The mobility reports are relayed to Doctors, family and to user.

MONITORING CARDIAC RESPONSES WHILE ACTIVITY

Sanket can be improvised for continuos monitoring mode during experimental activity tests. With single recharge, Sanket can continously record for 48 hours. Hence as a replacement of Holter devices, Sanket can . improved improved results in a very user freindly way. In case of any dangerous cardiac activity, instant alerts can be sent to user, doctors and family.

EXCERSIE ROUTINES AND HISTORIC TRENDS

With the help of a cardiac therapist, excercise routine can be set up. While the patient follows or not follows the excercise routine, the information can be passed to therapist.   All teh information is presented in the mobile app in a very smart dashboard, which motivated the patient to adhere to the therapy.

MAINTAIN OPTIMAL HEALTH

After almost 8 weeks, Sanket automatically learns usual patterns of the patient and then Sanket helps maintain the same pattern so that patient always maintains optimal health