India needs a comprehensive approach to combating heart disease -Vice President

Vice President inaugurates 11th World Heart Day event

The Vice President of India, Shri M. Hamid Ansari said that we would need a comprehensive approach to combating heart disease. He was addressing the inaugural session of 11th Annual World Heart Day event, here today.

The Vice President has said that India has seen a rapid transition in its heart disease burden over the past couple of decades and the load of communicable and non‐communicable diseases is projected to get reversed in 2020. Demographic projections suggest a major increase in cardiovascular disease mortality as life expectancy increases and the age structure of the growing population changes, he added.

Shri M. Hamid Ansari said that the growth of heart diseases is dependent on a number of interlinked factors such as aging, changing lifestyles and food habits and rapidly evolving socioeconomic determinants like access to healthcare, environmental stress and income levels also impact cardiovascular diseases risk factors.

The Vice President said that we would need a comprehensive approach to combating heart disease, with a focus on education and access to proper health facilities. For this both the public and the private sectors have to work together, he added.

Following is the text of the Vice President’s inaugural address:

“I am delighted to be part of the programs to commemorate World Heart Day.

The World Heart Day, since 2000, has become a landmark event to inform and educate the people around the world about health risks related to the human heart. The focus of the activities related to the world heart day has been on creating awareness to allow the people to make healthy choices and reduce cardiovascular risk. Such an effort is much needed given that heart disease are now the world’s leading causes of death, claiming 17.3 million lives each year.

I applaud these efforts to educate the people on the problems and causes of heart disease and to work together with– our doctors, scientists, teachers, businessmen, parents and children – to promote healthy lifestyles and ensure a healthier future for our people.

India has seen a rapid transition in its heart disease burden over the past couple of decades. The load of communicable and non‐communicable diseases is projected to get reversed in 2020. Demographic projections suggest a major increase in cardiovascular disease mortality as life expectancy increases and the age structure of the growing population changes.

A conservative estimate indicates that there could be more than 30 million heart patients in India, of which about 14 million are in urban and 16 million in rural areas. If the current trend continues by the year 2020, the burden of atherothrombotic cardiovascular diseases in India will surpass other regions of the world.

The growth of heart diseases is dependent on a number of interlinked factors such as aging, changing lifestyles and food habits. Rapidly evolving socioeconomic determinants like access to healthcare, environmental stress and income levels also impact cardiovascular diseases risk factors.

However, the growth of heart diseases affects not just the urban and economically well‐off but also the under privileged. The Indian rural population and urban poor are facing a “double burden” – with incidences of acute diseases continuing, while there is a rapid growth in incidences of chronic diseases.

The key challenges being faced in cardiac care in India are low availability of facilities, lack of accessibility, and limited affordability of effective and efficient treatment, coupled with lack of awareness towards non-communicable diseases including cardiovascular diseases.

In response to ever-rising burden of cardiovascular diseases, the Government has initiated an integrated National Programme for Prevention and Control of Cancers, Diabetes, Cardiovascular Diseases and Stroke (NPCDCS). The aim of the program is prevention and control of common non-communicable disease risk factors through an integrated approach and reduction of premature morbidity and mortality. The programme has led to some capacity building of health systems and improvement in quality of care; large gaps however still exists and there is extreme pressure on the limited resources available.

The Public Health Foundation of India in collaboration with the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare has also started programmes to advance consciousness of disease prevention measures. These include early detection, healthy lifestyle and diet, physical activity, yoga and stress management.

The Parliament in 2003 passed the Cigarettes and other Tobacco Products Act to further the cause of prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

Today, cardiac hospitals in India perform over 200,000 open heart surgeries per year, one of the highest, worldwide. There has been a steady annual rise to the tune of 25‐30 percent per year in the number of coronary interventions over the past several years. This suggests that the disease is now achieving epidemic proportions; it also shows that the accessibility of the population to advanced cardiac facilities is increasing.

We would need a comprehensive approach to combating heart disease, with a focus on education and access to proper health facilities. For this both the public and the private sectors have to work together. Events like the World Heart Day go a long way in bringing the risk of heart diseases into focus and riveting public attention on this issue.

I commend the organizers for taking this initiative. I wish them success in this endeavor.

Jai Hind.”

Source here

Abstract

Introduction

This research is meant to establish if a patient monitored with mobile cardiac telemetry (MCT) sees different outcomes regarding diagnostic yield of arrhythmia, therapeutic management through the use of antiarrhythmic drugs, and cardiovascular costs incurred in the hospital setting when compared with more traditional monitoring devices, such as the Holter or the Event monitor.

Materials and methods

We conducted a retrospective analysis spanning 57 months of claims data from January 2007 to September 2011 pertaining to 200,000+ patients, of whom 14,000 used MCT only, 54,000 an Event monitor only, and 163,000 a Holter monitor only. Those claims came from the Truven database, an employer database that counts 2.8 million cardiovascular patients from an insured population of about 10 million members. We employed a pair-wise pre/post test-control methodology, and ensured that control patients were similar to test patients along the following dimensions: age, geographic location, type of cardiovascular diagnosis both in the inpatient and outpatient settings, and the cardiovascular drug class the patient uses.

Results

First, the diagnostic yield of patients monitored with MCT is 61%, that is significantly higher than that of patients that use the Event monitor (23%) or the Holter monitor (24%). Second, patients naive to antiarrhythmic drugs initiate drug therapy after monitoring at the following rates: 61% for patients that use MCT compared with 39% for patients that use the Event and 43% for patients that use the Holter. Third, there are very significant inpatient cardiovascular savings (in the tens of thousands of dollars) for patients that undergo ablation, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and valve septa. Savings are more modest but nonetheless significant when it comes to the heart/pericardium procedure.

Conclusion

Given the superior outcome of MCT regarding both patient care and hospital savings, hospitals only stand to gain by enforcing protocols that favor the MCT system over the Event or the Holter monitor.

Keywords: mobile cardiac telemetry, Holter monitor, Event monitor, diagnostic yield, arrhythmia
Full article and source here

Why to use SanketLife

SanketLife – A Portable ECG Monitor, offer many advantages beyond its much larger version, which is the traditional 12-lead ECG machine. A handheld ECG monitor is convenient, easy to use, and economical. With the help of this heart monitoring device, you can record cardiac activity anywhere, anytime, and within minutes.

SanketLife is light and compact. Operating it is even simpler than a digital sphygmomanometer. It is an ideal choice as a Personal ECG Monitor

Since changes in heart activity can happen irregularly, and not always while you are at a medical facility, doing EKG – ECG monitoring at home or in the office can help capture and save significant cardiac activities that would help your doctor analyze your condition. The best time to do a reading is when you are feeling sickly and when you are experiencing some symptoms of an impending heart attack.

When the patient is not feeling well, he or she, or even someone else, can instantly take a reading by means of a SanketLife- Handheld ECG Monitor. If the results are beyond normal limits, go to the hospital immediately to seek emergency medical attention.

SanketLife is also an essential tool in studying sleep apnea. Studies have shown that obstructive sleep apnea changes healthy heart rate dynamics. Through periods of prolonged obstructive sleep apnea, cardiac rate typically shows a recurring fluctuation associated with the apneic stage and the resumption of breathing. By analyzing the EKG-ECG data, a study has revealed that obstructive sleep apnea can be detected in more than 93% of the trial cases.

Additionally, handheld ECG monitoring could reduce false heart attack scares, which can cause loads of stress and worry, and in turn might even trigger a real cardiac arrest.

Proper interpretation of ECG recordings would require extensive preparation. However, a patient must be able to recognize if he/she is feeling well, and whether there are any changes to the ECG waveform.

SanketLife can be a good substitute to a Holter monitor. A Holter monitor is a device used to record the heart’s rhythm. This monitor has many leads, and it is usually worn for 24 to 48 hours while performing normal activities. It could detect cardiac episodes that occur every day in patients with heart conditions. However, to track infrequent cardiac events, a Holter monitor is not adequate. Also, wearing this device can be quite uncomfortable.

Patients can also use SanketLife to gauge the effects of changes in medicine and their development.

Personal ECG monitors are very suitable for home care providers and nursing homes to monitor their patients’ conditions and improvement. As inexpensive and quality portable ECG monitors are now widely available, and since little knowledge is required to take measurements, all patients with heart conditions would benefit greatly with their own handheld ECG monitor. With certain training, anyone can learn to identify abnormal readings; and in case of emergency, the data can be promptly relayed to a doctor or hospital staff.

Lastly, portable ECG monitors may also be used in doctors’ offices as part of their routine check-up. Taking a measurement is fast and easy that even the doctor’s secretary can do it